NTT and Hokkaido National University researchers break record for longest-distance power delivery

NTT and Hokkaido National University researchers achieve world record for longest-distance power delivery using fiber optics, with potential for disaster relief and more.

NTT and Hokkaido National University researchers break record for longest-distance power delivery
Published by Liam @ PC Game Spotlight 6 months ago


NTT and Hokkaido National University Break World Record for Long-Distance Power Delivery Using Fiber Optics

The researchers have broken a world record for the longest-distance Power Delivery using fiber optics, with implications for disaster relief/recovery and power delivery in remote locations without complex electrical infrastructure. Using NTT’s multicore optical fiber technology, the group was able to push light from a 1,550 nm light source for a distance of over 10 km, delivering over 1 W of power. A 14 km distance was achieved, achieving a world-record 14 W/km for the optical power supply system.

Previously, the maximum distance for power delivery via a single fiber was 2 km, due to optical intensity limits within the fiber. Using NTT’s multicore fiber, however, it’s possible to use multiple cores for different purposes. In this case, light from the 1,550 nm light source was pushed into all four optical cores, while two cores were used for data transmission.

The researchers were able to achieve data transmission at a speed of 10 Gbps, which is comparable to current optical communication systems. Approximately 1 W of power was sent across a 14 km distance, achieving a world-record 14 W/km for the optical power supply system.

“These results clearly demonstrate that the world’s longest-range power supply system using optical fibers has already matured and will contribute to the future development of next-generation optical communication and photonics,” the researchers say.

“This achievement will also contribute to the realization of a highly resilient society where people can live safely even when disaster strikes.”

Advances in photonics technology mean that long-range energy delivery and wired communication are becoming increasingly possible, with simple and cost-effective solutions possible when there is no electrical infrastructure.

As the technology continues to develop, we’re likely to see many more applications in the future.

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