Lexar’s DDR5-6000 memory kit surprises, but not exactly in a good way

Lexar's Ares RGB DDR5-6000 C34 memory kit offers Intel XMP 3.0 and AMD EXPO support, but its performance on AMD is disappointing.

Lexar’s DDR5-6000 memory kit surprises, but not exactly in a good way
Published by Liam @ PC Game Spotlight 9 months ago


Lexar Ares RGB DDR5-6000 C34: A Mixed Bag for AMD and Intel

Lexar’s Ares RGB DDR5-6000 C34 memory kit offers Intel XMP 3.0 and AMD EXPO support, and its price is reasonable. However, I found mixed results on both AMD and Intel, with the former performing at the bottom of the stack in applications but in the middle for gaming.

I’ve been seeing more and more memory companies expanding their portfolios, and Lexar is no exception in recent months. Its Ares series is the company’s first DDR5 offering, and the RGB model we have on hand today is aimed at gaming builds.

The Ares RGB DDR5-6000 C34 comes in a 32GB (2x16GB) capacity, with data rates of DDR5-5600, DDR5-6000, or DDR5-6400. All three models have default timings of DDR5-4800 but support XMP 3.0 and AMD EXPO profiles for the aforementioned speeds.

I’m not a fan of single-rank designs, but I do appreciate the aluminum heat spreader and translucent light bar on these modules. They’re compatible with most motherboard lighting systems and come with the Lexa RGB Sync software for customizing the colors.

Meanwhile, the Ares RGB DDR5-6000 C34’s timings are decent for the price. They’re actually better than a few more expensive 16GB kits that I’ve looked at recently, which is a point in its favor. Of course, it would be nice if it could match them for price, but that’d make it more competitive.

I tested the Ares RGB DDR5-6000 C34 on both an AMD Ryzen 7 3700X and Intel Core i9-9900K. For the former, I used the ASUS ROG Strix X570-F Gaming motherboard, while the latter got the full treatment with the ASUS ROG Dominus Extreme.

In general, I found mixed performance results on both platforms. On the AMD side, the DDR5-6000 kit performed at the bottom of the stack in applications but in the middle for gaming.

On Intel, the story is a bit different. I saw a lot of good showings in benchmarks, but gaming was a bit more mixed. At times, it felt like I was getting the best performance out of the Ares RGB DDR5-6000 C34, but other times, I could feel it pulling back.

I also overclocked the Ares RGB DDR5-6000 C34 to DDR5-6600 with relaxed timings and increased DRAM voltage. At DDR5-6000, it performed well with a CAS Latency of 30 cycles. It performed better on the ASUS ROG Dominus Extreme than on the ASUS ROG Strix X570-F Gaming, but it wasn’t night and day.

In the end, the Lexar Ares RGB DDR5-6000 C34 is a good choice for gaming builds on an Intel platform, but it’s not the best out there. Meanwhile, it’s a bit of a letdown on AMD, especially considering the price. Lowering that might make it more competitive, but for now, it’s a choice I’d recommend for Intel over AMD.

The Lexar Ares RGB DDR5-6000 C34 will set you back $99.99. That’s reasonable but not the cheapest out there, and it’s comparable to some higher-capacity kits. Entry-level DDR5-6000 kits start at $75 but have worse timings.

Ultimately, I’d recommend considering alternatives at the same price or slightly more expensive.

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